Butterick Pattern Reviews

I have always found Butterick patterns easy to use. They go together with little trouble. Like others have pointed out, they do have a habit of spreading the pattern pieces out across several sheets of the tissue paper, making so you have to open everyone to find all the pieces you are working with. The only other fault that I find with their patterns is how they are folded. They are very difficult to fold back  to smoothly go back in the envelope.

(Listed in order by pattern number)

B3072 – Mens 18th Century Outfit

Recommended

This is a great pattern for an 18th century historical look, with the exception of the pants. When making this, I subsituted the pants from Simplicity 4923 (you can read more about them in that pattern review). The reason I made the switch is because the pants in this pattern are basic slip on pants, with elastic at the waist and knees, and I wanted a more accurate look. Other than skipping the pants, the rest of this pattern went together nicely. I did make the size listed for my husbands measurements, and it has enough ease that he is comfortable in it. I could’ve went a size smaller to get the historically correct fit, but he would rather have the comfort over the historical fit. lol. The jacket is unlined, and the pocket flaps are faux, but both are an easy fix, either when constructing or later on down the road. I do have plans to make him a couple more outfits from this pattern.

For information on the costume pictured above, please visit my project for 18th Century Men’s Outfit.

B5556 – 1955 Retro Dress

 

Highly Recommended

This is a modern reprint of a  vintage Butterick pattern from 1955. The instructions have been rewritten in the format currently used by most commerical pattern companies.

I loved using this pattern. It is very simple, and straight forward. The construction is quick and easy. This would be a great weekend project. The pattern includes built-in sleeves (no need to fuss with setting in the sleeves just right), full skirts, pockets at the front of the skirts, a 1″ wide belt, and a zipper closure just under the left arm. The only issue I had was with the wording in the instructions on how to put together the collar. I had to set the instructions aside, and work off of experience. Please note, however, that Butterick patterns tend to run a little small in sizing, and are made for women 5’7″ or shorter (which works great for me, as I am 5’5″). For most patterns I can typically use a size 18 or 20, for this pattern I had to use a 22, based on my bust size (which was the last size available for this pattern).

Note: The skirt is a full-circle, and because this style of skirt is partially cut on the bias, it will need to hang from a dressmaker’s dummy for a couple of day before being hemmed (the skirt needs to stretch out).

For more information on the dress in the picture below, please visit the project page for Retro Tipsy Tea: 1950’s Dress.

 

 

B5708 – 1953 Retro Dress

 

Highly Recommended

This is a modern reprint of a  vintage Butterick pattern from 1953. The instructions have been rewritten in the format currently used by most commerical pattern companies.

This is another easy retro pattern from Butterick. My daughter, Katie, made this dress for the 3rd Annual Ladies Tipsy Tea. However, construction was stepped up a bit, as she wanted to wear this to her band banquet. As she is a beginning sewer, I supervised her in the construction, and stepped in at the end when time constraints would’ve prevented her from finishing on time. This is an easy dress to construct. And, as shown on the pattern pouch, can be worn in various ways, depending on your mood. I will note that Butterick patterns sometimes do not fit larger bust sizes well, and you may have to make adjustments. With this pattern, we had to place small darts on either side of the neck line, to keep the neckline from revealing too much. In all other areas, this dress fit very well based on Katie’s bust size. All pattern pieces are marked very clearly for ease of construction, and the instructions are very well written. For a more advanced sewer, this would be a delightful weekend project.

Note: The skirt is a full-circle, and because this style of skirt is partially cut on the bias, it will need to hang from a dressmaker’s dummy for a couple of day before being hemmed (the skirt needs to stretch out).

(Will edit to add a photo of the dress, when available.)

 

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